Dog Obedience Training Arizona

Great Arizona Dog Obedience Training Techniques:

A dog provides unconditional love and friendship to a caring owner. A well-trained dog in Arizona increases your pleasure and satisfaction ten times over, as compared to an untrained dog. Studies have shown that a well-trained dog is a happier and more content animal than one who is not. When proper training techniques are employed, you will be surprised how quickly a dog will learn to follow your commands.

Dog Trainer

The following are examples of some great dog training techniques you can use to teach your Arizona dog some basic obedience skills:

The Sit Command –

This is the most common and basic command to teach your dog and probably should be the first thing you teach him. Using a treat as a reward for good behavior works well for most dog training purposes. You will need a leash attached to your dog’s collar to hold him steady. Show your dog a treat that you have in your hand and hold it over his head causing him to look up, and then say “Sit”. Sometimes, just by holding the treat over his head your dog will automatically sit. If he does not sit, place your other hand on your dog’s rear and gently press down saying “Sit”. Once he does sit, reward him immediately with the treat and praise him by saying “Good Boy” in a happy voice and pet him vigorously showing him you are pleased with his response to your “Sit” command. It’s important to reward him immediately after he responds correctly, so he knows why he is receiving the reward.

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The Lie Down Command –

Once your dog has mastered the sit command, you can progress to the “Lie Down” command. A treat is also used to accomplish this with most Arizona trainers. First ask your dog to “Sit”. Do not give him a treat for sitting. While he is in the sitting position you should have a treat in your hand and hold it in front of him, very close to the floor and say “Lie Down”. If necessary place your other hand on your dogs shoulders and gently press down until your dog lies down or give him a gentle tug downward on his leash. Once your dog lies down, reward him immediately with a treat and say “Good Boy” in a happy voice and pet him vigorously showing him you are pleased with his response to your “Lie Down” command. The tone of your voice is important to let your pet know you are pleased with his response to your command.

Dog Obedience Training

Stay Command –

The “Stay” command is a little more challenging than the Sit and Lie Down Commands. It is important to choose the appropriate time during the day to begin working with your dog on the “Stay” command. Knowing your own dog and recognizing when he is displaying a relaxed or mellow temperament is important. You do not want to begin this training when your dog is excited or overly playful. As with the previous training commands, it is useful to use a treat when teaching the “Stay” command. To start this training give your dog the sit or lie down command. Once he is sitting or lying down say “Stay” and hold your hand up as if you were signaling someone to stop. If the dog does not move for 4 or 5 seconds, give him a treat and say “Good Boy” and pet him. Only give him praise if he stays for the 4 or 5 seconds. If he does not obey your command, try again. Once he gets the idea, increase the amount of time he must “Stay” before you give him praise. You may have to repeat the “Stay” command a few times and put your hand in a stop position to encourage him to stay. As he begins to understand, give him the “Stay” command and slowly back away a few feet, gradually increasing the distance until he masters the “Stay” command. Remember, it is important to be patient with your dog when training. If training is not successful today, just try again on another day. Patience and persistence is always rewarded.

Dog Obedience Training

Employ Traditional Training Techniques –

When I talk about “Traditional” training techniques in Arizona, I am referring to a few basic techniques that are important in training your dog.

– The first and most importance is patience. You need to be patient with your dog when teaching him new things. As with people, different dogs learn at different rates of speed. If your dog is not catching on to a new command, be patient! Do not yell or bully your dog. Sometimes it’s better to stop training and begin again another day.

– Voice inflection is another very important part of training your dog. I refer to this as speaking in a “Happy Voice” to reward your dog when he responds to your command correctly. This means talking is a slightly higher pitched tone and slightly louder/excited manner than you would normal speak.

Dog Training

– Using dog treats is another common or traditional way of training your dog. Although treats are useful in the initial training of a command, you don’t want to have to carry a pocket full of treats with you at all times in order for your dog to obey your commands. You need to gradually eliminate the treats once your dog has mastered a new command and replace it with a “Good Boy” and energetic petting.

-It is important that everyone in your family use the exact same commands so your dog does not become confused on what is being asked of him e.g. “lie down” vs. “down”. It doesn’t matter what the command is, as long as everyone is using the same command.

– Finally, you need to make your Arizona training sessions fun for your dog. He should associate a training session with having fun. So, after a training session you should play with your dog for ten or fifteen minutes making the session enjoyable for both you and your dog.

Dog Training - How To Become A Dog Whisperer?

Puppy Training

It’s downright infuriating to look out the window and see Buddy digging another hole in the yard. You yell out the window; he may or may not even acknowledge he’s heard anything; then back to the digging. This dog behavior has got to stop. WHY DOGS DIG..... Did you ever stop to think WHY Buddy digs? (except to make you mad!). This is the real trick – to figure out why he’s digging in the first place, the motivation behind the dog behavior. Then you can take dog training steps to discourage it, redirect that energy and possibly stop it completely. 1. I’M BORED! Location: Digging along the fence lines and at the gate. Why? He is bored and wants to get out for some action. Solution: Provide more exercise for your dog, both physical and mental. The more exercise the better, according to your dog. A tired, happy dog will rest nicely between great outings. 2. I’M HOT!! Location: Digging along the edge of the house or shallow "pits," especially in the heat of the summer. Why? Your dog is most likely creating a cool spot in the cool under-earth. If under the porch, he’s creating a den. Solution: Check to make sure you are providing fresh cool water throughout the day and night. Is there adequate shade to protect your dog from the hot sun? Is good air circulation available or possibly a nice breeze? Or is the space filled with stagnant air? Provide plant life (trees, bushes) for shelter from the hot sun. Cool grass keeps the ground heat down. 3. IT’S JUST MY NATURE! Sometimes it’s the breed of dog, not so much the environment. Some breeds tend to be burrowers -- hounds, huskies, malamutes are a few examples. Solution: If this is the case, work with your dog to agree on a place he can do his thing and camouflage it with something like plants or fencing. 4. I LIKE IT!! Some dogs just like to dig, and dig they will, no matter how much you yell and scream. Solution: Create and help them with the ideal digging place -- a sandy blend with hidden treasures that reward digging at that spot. Having a prepared area encourages the digger to focus the digging to the area you set up in an out-of-the-way place. Remember to keep the area stocked with assorted treats and toys. TO FILL OR NOT TO FILL ..... EXISTING HOLES The second part of the story is..... What to do with the holes that keep reappearing, no matter what you do? Have you back-filled holes dug by your dog only to find them dug again, over and over? When this happens, the next stage of hole-filling is called for. You might think this next step it involves yelling at your dog, or rapping on the window. Nope. Are you really going to stand and stare out the window hoping to correct the situation while it’s happening (which would be the only way to really correct it using this method)? TECHNIQUES FOR "FILLING" HOLES There are two better techniques to encourage your dog to rethink digging that hole. The easier of the two is to fill the hole until almost full. Mix the last portion of dirt with dog poo, pinecones, moth balls, or other repelling non-harmful substance. The next time your dog arrives for the big dig, he quickly finds the game has changed. Most dogs quickly change their behavior. The second method is more time consuming but effective. Cut a section of chicken wire or similar to cover the hole plus 8 inches or more. Dig a hole a few inches deep that surrounds the hole and will fit the wire shape. Fill the hole and then press wire in place and cover with dirt. Pack the area well, particularly around the wire edges. When your dog returns, the wire will stop his digging progress. If along a fence line, secure the wire to the fence along the inside of the fence, just a short distance from the ground. When the wire gets to the ground, keep going vertically a short distance underground. Then bend the wire so the bottom is perpendicular to the top (forms an L). Bury the horizontal part underground inside the fence, pointing away from the fence. When your dog digs he is stopped by the wire and his weight on the earth helps keep the wire in place. The result is the dog gives up on that area. Pretty cool, huh?! CONCLUSION We humans see digging as bad dog behavior. Dogs don’t, and they dig for different reasons. If you can figure out why they’re digging, you can put dog training steps in place to stop it. Some dogs dig, that’s what they do. Set them up a space to dig and you both win! Try these dog training techniques to change unwanted dog behavior. They seriously work.

Arizona Dog Training Techniques – Reward Training – Easy, Fun and Effective!

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Reward training (which is sometimes also called lure training) is a very effective training technique for teaching dogs a number of desired behaviors. And, in addition to being highly effective, reward training is an easy, fun method to use. This particular Arizona based training technique provides much quicker, more dependable results than methods that rely heavily on scolding, corrections or punishment, and it does it in a way that’s much more positive for both you and your dog.

Because reward training is so effective, it’s currently one of the most popular dog training techniques. At its heart, reward training works because you reward your dog with a treat or tidbit of food whenever he does what you ask. Most owners accompany the food reward with verbal praise. The food and praise are positive reinforcement which helps your dog learn to associate the action he performed with good things (food and praise) and encourages him to repeat that behavior again.

In Home Dog Training

In addition to being effective, reward training provides a much more positive training atmosphere than some other training techniques. Because it’s a reward-based method, you reward your dog whenever he does as you ask. Scolding, striking, punishing or correcting your dog for not following your command is never used in reward training. You simply reward and reinforce the actions you do want your dog to perform. This positive reinforcement makes reward training a much more pleasant experience for owners and dogs than punishing him.

You do need to be careful in Arizona to only give your dog treats at the right time during training sessions, however. If the timing of the rewards is unrelated to your dog doing as you ask, he’ll get confused about what you want, and he might even start thinking he’ll get treats no matter what. So, make sure you only reward your dog for doing something right.

In some ways, reward training is the opposite of aversive dog training, where dogs are trained to associate undesirable behaviors with negative reinforcement such as scolding, corrections or outright punishment. The negative reinforcement stops when the dog performs the desired behavior. In theory, this process discourages dogs from repeating unwanted actions and trains them to do what owners want, but in the long run it’s an unpleasant process and not nearly as effective as reward training. Instead of punishing your dog for what he does wrong, reward training lets you show your dog what you want him to do and then reward him when he does it.

Dog Training

Take housetraining, for example. The two methods approach the task in significantly different ways. There are a multitude of places a dog could relieve himself inside the house, and they’re all unacceptable. If you used aversive training techniques, you’d need to wait for your dog to eliminate somewhere in the house and then correct him when he does. Think about this for a minute. Isn’t it unfair to punish your dog before he’s had a chance to learn your rules? And, you need to realize that using this method for housetraining can require numerous corrections and a lot of time. Isn’t it quicker, easier and more effective to simply show your dog the right place to relieve himself and then reward him when he uses it?

There’s another reason why reward training produces better results than aversive training in Az. Consistency is essential when you’re training a dog. If you’re using corrections and punishment to discourage unwanted behavior, you’ll need to consistently punish your dog each and every time he performs that behavior. Well, we’re not robots, and it’s impossible to be ready to do this every minute of the day. You’d need to never leave home and never take your eyes off your dog before you’d even have a chance of punishing him every time he makes a behavioral mistake. Make one slip-up and fail to punish your dog for a mistake, and he’ll learn that sometimes he can get away with the misbehavior. That’s probably not the lesson you want him to learn.

Unlike aversive training, reward training doesn’t require you to be infallibly consistent in your reactions to your dog’s misbehaviors. You don’t need to reward your dog every time he does as you ask – in fact, he’ll learn just as quickly (if not more so) if the rewards he receives for desired behavior are intermittent and unpredictable instead of being given every time he performs the behavior. And, above all, if you make mistakes with aversive training you risk losing your dog’s trust. That won’t happen with reward training, where mistakes might temporarily confuse your dog, but they won’t cause him to become aggressive or fear or mistrust you.

Dog Aggression Training

In addition to house training your dog here in Arizona, you can use reward training to teach him a number of obedience commands (“sit,” “stay,” “come” and “down,” for example) and an assortment of fun tricks. But you can also discourage problem behaviors with reward training. For example, if you want to train your dog not to chew on your socks, teach him what he is allowed to chew (a toy, for example), and then reward him when he chews on it. Or, if you want your dog to stop jumping up on your guests when they come through your door, teach him to sit when visitors arrive and reward him for that behavior.